Promotional video for Steampunk’d

Jeannie_Group_1919RA promotional video for the new making series “Steampunk’d” on the GSN YouTube page and the puns are already coming thick and fast. “Blood sweat and gears” was the first one, just seconds in. It shows snippets of the show so that an idea can be made about how the show is constructed and the kind of drama that comes when you cram a group of steampunks in a room together. After all, not only have they each got a unique idea of steampunk, they also have to merge it with other ideas and have to avoid getting booted off the show if they come last. The video ends with the overly dramatic American voiceover claiming “When you play with steam, someone’s bound to get burned.”

I did have a little chuckle when Thomas Willeford said he was going to crush the soul of anyone producing shoddy work and I actually believe him. I’m still unsure about the friendships that are already cemented before the show started and that’s something I’m going to be looking out for. The fact that I know that JW and Kato are good friends, then the video shows JW “train-rollering” the task made me immediately wonder if it’s because he thinks maybe he has an advantage?

I don’t want to speculate too much until I’ve seen the show, but I can’t shake the problem.

3 thoughts on “Promotional video for Steampunk’d

    1. Just as an addition to this in case you weren’t satisfied with my ambiguous message earlier. The dictionary definition gives two variations. One is indeed indicative of someone practicing law, but the other is listed here:

      es·quire
      ˈeskwīr,iˈskwīr/
      noun
      noun: Esquire; noun: Esq.; noun: esquire; plural noun: esquires; noun: esq.

      1.
      North American
      a title appended to a lawyer’s surname.
      British
      a polite title appended to a man’s name when no other title is used, typically in the address of a letter or other documents.
      “Robert A. Pearson Esquire”
      2.
      historical
      a young nobleman who, in training for knighthood, acted as an attendant to a knight.

      Given that I’m British, I find that description more befitting. 😉

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